Turkey

Turkey

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The Economist reports that after the coup on July 15, over 80,000 people were arrested, and investigators seem more concerned that those who were arrested have ties to the Gülen-network other than their participation in the attempted coup.

Turkish human rights organizations state that after July 15 over 3000 judges were deposed, of which 400 judges have been arrested. There were only 7,000 judges in Turkey. Earlier this year, many judges were removed from offices in the cities and in rural areas.

Turkish lawyers say that the legal system is now paralyzed, it moves so slowly now that no one knows when issues come up. Lawyers show up in court when summoned, but there is rarely a prosecutor or judge. Several people have observed that many of the newly appointed judges do not know, or care about, the international law obligations by which Turkey is bound.

There is still a state of emergency in Turkey and President Erdogan justified on September 1st the need for the state of emergency because of the fight against the PKK (Kurdistan Workers Party), the fight against ISIL, and the fight against the banned Gülen- network. The President also stated that the European Convention on Human Rights (ECHR) does not apply to Turkey as long as it is in a state of emergency. Erdogan has also extended the ability to keep people in detention without judicial review from 3 to 30 days. In many cases, detainees are denied contact with a lawyer.

News on the situation in Turkey:

News on the situation in Turkey:

http://www.aftenposten.no/meninger/kronikk/Langlesing-NATO-landet-Tyrkias-krig-mot-reportere-og-journalistikk–Iyad–El-Baghdadi-10435b.html

http://www.dusun-think.net/

http://www.dusun-think.net/?s=haberler&id=4897 (Freedom House: Turkey suffers worst decline in freedoms in 2016)